Innovative Practices

The following are examples of innovative practices philanthropic organizations have supported, developed and/or implemented regarding the environment:

 

Baton Rouge Area Foundation

Led the new initiative and funded efforts to assemble the best planners to re-envision Louisiana’s master plan. “Living with Water”— Greater New Orleans Urban Water Plan is a resiliency planning study to develop sustainable strategies for managing the water resources of St. Bernard and the East Banks of Jefferson and Orleans Parishes. The project addresses three basic issues: flooding caused by heavy rainfall, subsidence caused by the pumping of storm water, and wasted water assets.

 

Baton Rouge Area Foundation

Helped launch The Water Institute of the Gulf: a not-for-profit, independent research institute dedicated to advancing the understanding of coastal, deltaic, river and water resource systems, both within the Gulf Coast and around the world. Their mission supports the practical application of innovative science and engineering, providing solutions that benefit society.

 

New Jersey Recovery Fund

Supported a project to remove over 1.5 million pounds of debris and lay down nearly 90 million pounds of sand across five beaches in the Delaware Bay region of New Jersey. When Hurricane Sandy hit the U.S. East Coast in October 2012, it threatened the survival of a 400-million-year-old crab species and about a million shorebirds that rely on the crabs’ eggs for nourishment during long migrations. Retreating storm waters took with them two to three feet of sand from the Delaware Bay beaches in NJ where horseshoe crabs lay eggs and left behind piles of debris, destroying 70 percent of the crab’s prime nesting zones in the area. The restoration project was a partnership of the American Littoral Society, The Wetlands Institute, LJ Niles Associates, Dianne Daly CEP, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, The Richard Stockton College of NJ Coastal Research Center, and Middle Township.

 

Roughly one million shorebirds pass through the Delaware Bay in the spring, when the largest population of horseshoe crabs in the world turns up to spawn. Credit: smallbones/Wikimedia

Roughly one million shorebirds pass through the Delaware Bay in the spring, when the largest population of horseshoe crabs in the world turns up to spawn. Credit: smallbones/Wikimedia

 

New Jersey Recovery Fund, New Jersey Coastal Management Program and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration

Supported the development and launch of NJADAPT — a collaborative effort of scientists and data managers in academia, government, the private sector and the NGO community who have developed a strategic plan for a New Jersey platform to host and apply climate science impacts and data.   See Impact Stories for more information on this project.

 

Gulf Coast Fund

Formed in the weeks following Katrina by a consortium of foundations that recognized that it would be important to provide on-going accurate information about toxic exposure. The Fund partners with Bridge the Gulf Project (see Arts and Culture and Community Recovery sections for more info on this).

 

Expert Spotlight: Kate Orff, Founder, SCAPE / LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE